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Coccidiosis Treatment

Coccidiosis Treatment in Goats

Important! Please Read The Following Notice!  All information provided in these articles is based either on personal experience or information provided by others whose treatments and practices have been discussed fully with a vet for accuracy and effectiveness before passing them on to readers. Much of my page content is from Veterinary Colleges and Manuals.  In all cases, it is your personal responsibility to obtain veterinary services and advice before using any of the information provided in these articles. JoAnna Mertz is not a veterinarian. Neither JoAnna Mertz nor applejofarms.com nor any of the contributors to this website will be held responsible for the use of any information contained herein.

Coccidiosis in Kids!
  • What is Effective Treatment
  • When to Start Treatment
  • How does it work
  • Where to order Product to Treat Coccidiosis
Coccidiosis is the #1 killer in kids 1 year of age and younger.
  • A Coccidia Treatment: Deccox or Rumensin (Monensin) feed for the first four months or administer other coccidiostats as recommended by a veterinarian for your area. Deccox can also be added to loose salt at the rate of 2 lbs. Deccox to 50 lbs. loose salt. There are several Bovatek salts available that don’t need to be mixed. Sweetlix makes a mineral salt containing Rumensin.
  • AppleJo Farm uses Baycox only for Coccidia Treatment. It's gentle on their stomach and it's a one-two Dose treatment. Commercial sheep breeders use this because it is highly effective and really saves lives.
  • Dosage: Kids should get 1 dose at 1 week and 1 dose  14 days later, and 1 dose when they are weaned at 8 weeks, then 1 dose at month 3. Dosage: 1 ml up to 5.5 lbs. 
  •  Shake well before use. Each animal should be treated with a single 1 mL dose of Baycox per 2.5 kg or 5.5 lbs. body weight. Administer a single oral dose at 1 week of age. (Note if you get a kid that obviously has developed coccidiosis, dose them according to this and in 

  • To obtain maximum benefit, goats should be treated in the prepatent period before the expected onset of clinical signs. The prepatent period of Eimeria ovinoidalis is 12-15 days and the prepatent period of Eimeria crandalis is 15-20 days.

  • To obtain maximum benefit, kids should be treated in the prepatent period- before the expected onset of clinical signs.
  • Fact: Toltrazuril (Baycox) is active against all intracellular stages of coccidia.
  • Where to Purchase: Baycox is a Brand Name and has worked really well for AppleJo Farms. You can purchase it on some websites under the drug name: (toltrazuril) 5% Oral Suspension(make sure it is the 5%). You can buy as Toltrazuril 5% from HorsePreRace.com, however some have stated it does not work as well as the name brand Baycox
  • Baycox 5% may be purchased in smaller 10 ml emergency bottles or larger 45ml bottles, syringe included, and will be shipped Priority or Over night, from this website. Go to your cart at check out to find.
  • Storage: Store below 86 degrees F. Protect from freezing.
  • Does it work at all stages of coccidia development: Toltrazuril is active against all intracellular stages of coccidia, including schizonts, micro and macrogamonts. It interferes with the division of the protozoal nucleus, the activity of the mitochondria and damages the wall forming bodies in the microgametes. Toltrazuril produces severe vacuolisation of the protozoal endoplasmic reticulum in all intracellular development stages.

How long does it last: After oral administration, toltrazuril is absorbed slowly from the gut, indicated by a radio-active study using [triazine-2-14C]-marked toltrazuril. This is followed by a long-lasting distribution among the different compartments of the body. The plasma half-life is about 170 hours in lambs & kids (approx. 5 days). Excretion is characterized by a high fecal fraction with a relatively high excretion rate. There is no significant enterohepatic circulation.

Clinical Findings of Coccidiosis of Goats: Merck Vet Manual

Most clinical cases occur between 5–8 weeks of age. Most goat kids have inapparent infection. In subacute or acute infections, the usual signs are poor fecal pellet formation (pasty feces), decreased appetite, stary coat, and decreased weight gain. More severe acute cases show diarrhea with or without blood presence, possible tenesmus, dullness, anorexia, and weight loss. Severe problems lead to rapid onset of diarrhea, often with blood, tenesmus, signs of abdominal pain, lethargy, weakness, recumbency, and death. In chronic infections, there is increased time to puberty, increased time to finish, decreased weight gain, and decreased feed intake.

In most countries, few or no treatments are licensed for goats, although products licensed for cattle and sheep are often available which is the case in the USA. Water and feed intake is usually decreased in ill kids, so it is best to treat by drenching rather than rely on including any medicine in the drinking water or feed. It may be necessary to use electrolyte and nutritional solutions to feed ill kids because they can become anemic from the coccidia.

Natural products such as Lespedeza cuneata in feed pellets have decreased fecal signs and oocyst counts in kids. However, relying on this alone, to prevent coccidiosis in very young kids, is risky.

Important! Please Read The Following Notice!

All information provided in these articles is based either on personal experience or information provided by others whose treatments and practices have been discussed fully with a vet for accuracy and effectiveness before passing them on to readers. Much of my page content is from Veterinary Colleges and Manuals.

In all cases, it is your personal responsibility to obtain veterinary services and advice before using any of the information provided in these articles. JoAnna Mertz is not a veterinarian. Neither JoAnna Mertz nor applejofarms.com nor any of the contributors to this website will be held responsible for the use of any information contained herein.

AppleJo Farms is dedicated to breeding, nurturing and placing Registered Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats with Farms where they will flourish!

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